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That is a Great Question

My friend Stephen Green, otherwise known as “The Vodkapundit,” points out from the high plains of Colorado something rather hypocritical about many universal health care advocates.

If it’s wrong to draft people into the armed forces — and I believe it is — then where’s the right in drafting people into the insurance system?

An insurance “mandate” is an insurance industry draft, plain and simple. But there’s no deferment, the certainly no 4F, and running off to Canada would only make things worse.

The same question could be asked about Social Security and Medicare.

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  • I don't believe that the draft can be compared to requiring people to have health insurance. My wife is a pediatrician and when working in the ER she has to serve anyone that walks through the door. If they are 35 years old, they serve them. Illegal immigrant? Poor person? They get served. You can't do away with that, but what you can do is insure that everyone pays for the treatment that they receive. Lets say some college student decides he/she is perfectly healthy so they don't want insurance. Then they injure themselves playing frisbee or slip on some ice, whatever. What happens is that they go to the ER and get a bill. They can't afford that bill, so that gets passed on to other customers. I wish I remembered the % Childrens had to raise their prices to cover the insured and 'charity' cases. If there is a way to ensure that people who choose not to have insurance weren't able to pass costs on to me (or you), then I am fine with it. But right now that isn't the case.

    And furthermore, we require people here in Wisconsin to have auto insurance at least to cover the damage to someone elses car. Is that a draft? Really?

  • I don't believe that the draft can be compared to requiring people to have health insurance. My wife is a pediatrician and when working in the ER she has to serve anyone that walks through the door. If they are 35 years old, they serve them. Illegal immigrant? Poor person? They get served. You can't do away with that, but what you can do is insure that everyone pays for the treatment that they receive. Lets say some college student decides he/she is perfectly healthy so they don't want insurance. Then they injure themselves playing frisbee or slip on some ice, whatever. What happens is that they go to the ER and get a bill. They can't afford that bill, so that gets passed on to other customers. I wish I remembered the % Childrens had to raise their prices to cover the insured and 'charity' cases. If there is a way to ensure that people who choose not to have insurance weren't able to pass costs on to me (or you), then I am fine with it. But right now that isn't the case.

    And furthermore, we require people here in Wisconsin to have auto insurance at least to cover the damage to someone elses car. Is that a draft? Really?